The Basics on Paintball Barrels

Do you have the bug yet?  It doesn’t take many minutes of game play or visits to the field; once you’ve played paintball for a little while, you’ll get the urge to play more and more.  Once you’re hooked, you’ll be interested in improving your game and enhancing your equipment and apparel.  Paintball barrels present opportunities to augment your paintball marker.

If you’re a novice, we don’t want to confuse you; paintball barrels are not necessities of play, yet they do improve the performance of your gun.  Consider the following information about paintball barrels; it may persuade you to make an investment, improving your game and marker performance.

The game is constantly advancing as well as equipment, but at present, paintball barrels consist of three components.  The threading has grooves, allowing players to screw the barrel onto a gun.  The shaft is the solid portion of the barrel, allowing paintball travel.  The porting is located at the end of the barrel; holes line the porting up until the end, where the paintball exits.

All threading is not equal; don’t blindly purchase a barrel without ensuring it fits your gun.  Manufacturers usually produce barrels that fit guns of the same make (a Tippmann barrel usually fits a Tippmann gun).  There are adapters, enabling players to unite paintball barrels to guns of a different make.  When making an online purchase, make sure the barrel of interest fits your paintball marker.

There is some debate regarding performance and the length of paintball barrels.  Some believe a longer barrel makes for a more accurate shot.  This belief is true – to a certain degree.  A barrel exceeding one foot may actually hinder the performance of your gun.  A barrel exceeding 12 inches facilitates the de-acceleration of the paintball, causing the ball to travel a shorter distance, limiting performance.

The gun porting (holes at the end of the barrel) make for a quieter shot, helping air escape from within.  In general, more porting equals a quieter shot, yet also necessitates more air to shoot paintballs, decreasing the efficiency of the gun.

Barrels vary in diameter.  Paintballs, depending on the manufacturer, vary in diameter as well.  Seasoned players ensure their brand of paintball fits their paintball barrels.  Some test how a ball fits into a barrel to ensure a good fit; your paintball shouldn’t be able to roll down the barrel with nothing but the force of gravity catapulting it, yet it shouldn’t take more than a puff of air for a securely-placed ball to move down the barrel.

At present, barrels are made from steel, aluminum, and carbon fiber.  It’s understood the material doesn’t influence accuracy, yet lighter barrels generally cost more.  Take a look through our paintball barrels; we have a large supply from leading manufacturers.  Of course, you can always contact us with a question!

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