Tag Archives: paintball

3Skull Paintball Deluxe Dual Valve Co2 Tank Fill Station

 

tank fill station

This Deluxe Dual Vale fill station will get the job done. It fits all standard CO2 tanks and is relatively portable. It has one valve which releases the CO2 and one to fill the CO2. It’s durable and will last. You won’t have to replace this if it gets banged around a little! You can see more on our website.

 

Sniper Rifle for Paintball

paintball sniper

Trying to decide if a sniper paintball rifle is best for you? Here are some ideas to get you started.

AGD Longbow Paintball sniper guns come in a lot of different styles. You can take a look at the AGD Longbow upgrade package. This is a pricey marker but AGD only makes quality guns.

Phantom Style A pump gun, which ranges from cheap to expensive. It allows you to decide what works for your budget.

But it’s not the paintball sniper guns that make the sniper. A sniper is able to sneak in or be undetected until he makes his hit. Then you need to move from that spot un-noticed.

Paintball snipers should not be in groups of players. Snipers are most often found by themselves, they like the lone ranger style of play where the odds are stacked against them.

Paintball Camouflage can be one of the paintball snipers biggest investments. You can go for total body coverage with a Ghille Suit. But this will hinder your movement. The best idea is to break up your silhouette, a paintball players eyes are constantly scanning for a mask shape and color. Try breaking up your mask with a camo head net. Basic BDU camo will work fine.

Remember this point! Put yourself in a place that you can see well, with less movement. The human eye will focus on things that move, if you don’t have to move THEN DON’T! The common mistake is to turn your head or shift your leg. This movement will certainly give away your position. Try to find a mask that allows you to use your peripheral vision. Only move when you want to shoot.

What if you are spotted? Most likely if you are spotted, you will be out manned. Either go out blazing or run away and wait for another opportunity. Usually you can use this to your advantage and draw your enemy into a small ambush you setup. Run away and when you are out of their visual sight, make a quick cut left or right and either back track or wait for them to come find you.

Summary: It’s not the sniper paintball rifle that makes the paintball sniper. It’s the player and the choices you train yourself to make on the field

Celebrities on the Paintball Field

Angelina_Jolie_Brad_Pitt_Cannes

I always see celebrities as the glitz-and-glamour, the fame-and-the fortune type of people. Their job description probably requires them to look perfect from head to toe, anytime, anywhere, and anyplace. But then again, celebrities are actually just like us. They too also want to loosen up and enjoy what we common people enjoy; including paintball.

Did you ever wonder if there are celebrities who play paintball?

Do they have someone who keeps on following them to make sure they still look picture perfect even when they are on the field?

Well, YES there are celebrity paintballers; and NO they don’t bring their personal assistants on the field.

I did a bit of research and apparently, there is quite a list of celebrity paintballers. Here are some of them:

  1. The Pitt-Jolie Clan – These A-list couple relieved their Mr. and Mrs. Smith moments when they were sighted in a paintball game-field in Surrey, UK back in 2011. They brought the whole gang with them but only Maddox was big enough to play. Brad and Angelina sure know how to keep their babies happy.
  2. Keanu Reeves – Mr. Matrix might have got his iconic bullet-dodging moves from dodging paintballs first. He’s been seen on the field from time to time.
  3. Britney Spears – “Hit me baby one more time” may not be the best song when Britney goes paintballing, but who wouldn’t still want to share a bunker with her?

There are many more paintballing celebs – Adam Sandler, Maurice Gibbs of the Bee Gees which is a tournament level player, the Spice girls, Tom Hanks, and many more.

Who would you want to play paintball with?

 

A Proper Paintball Diet

Healthy Eating

In my experience, long-term endurance plays little in any paintball role. Games typically don’t last that long and any movement that you’re doing will be at max a 10-15 second sprint. After which, you’ll crouch or stand for a few minutes while shooting at someone. A more important thing to address would be your overall fitness, more specifically your diet.

Calories

First and foremost, attacking your diet is priority. The old mantra “calories in < calories out” still holds true, but aiming for a proper macronutrient ratio is ideal. Switching to a high protein and mid to low carb diet will help accelerate fat loss in the beginning. Contrary to what most people think or choose to believe, exercise will do little to nothing for your health if you are eating poorly. However, I do not mean to rule out the importance of exercise. Aside from the benefit of improved cardiovascular health associated with both weight lifting and cardio (yes, lifting does improve CV function), exercise will obviously increase net calorie expenditure and contribute to fat loss while adding lean muscle. In regards to sprinting versus sustained runs, honestly do whatever you can for now.

Diet > exercise

You’ll notice with a revamped diet an increase in energy levels which’ll also help with your exercise goals. I recommend a balanced workout regimen of both lifting and activity. A very good program I have seen used with great results is a typical 3x weekly full-body lift with 2 days of cardio interspersed. Full body lifts accentuate more overall body fitness than targeting single muscle groups just to blow them up while increasing your HR more and can mimic a cardio-lifting routine much in the way that CrossFit works.

I hope the info serves you well. Good luck, get to it, and you always have paintball to help with the cardio.

The Pros and Cons of Different Lens Tints

Paintball player

Lens tint on a paintball mask plays a large role in the effectiveness of how you adapt to the game or competition. Serious players acquire multiple lenses in a variety of colors when choosing a mask for versatility in playing options. This ensures the player always has an appropriate lens option depending on the specific style of play. When deciding on tint colors, consider the benefits and drawbacks of each hue.

Clear

Considered an everyday lens, all paintballers should carry at least one clear lens. Paintball masks with this lens offer optimal viewing indoors or outdoors, during daylight or nighttime hours. This is an extremely multipurpose lens that every player should possess.

Amber

This tint of a paintball mask may vary from yellow to orange. The color offers a number of benefits that include greater clarity in foggy, hazy or other low-light environments. Wear these lenses in dense forests, on rainy days or indoors in dimly lit conditions. Amber typically inhibits blue lights that hinder focus while red elements of the color enhance depth perception. Additionally, the amount of light allowed through this lens tint helps distinguish between low, medium and high lights and shadows, which means even if camouflaged, the movements of competitors becomes more visible.

Blue

When used on a paintball mask, a blue lens offers a number of benefits similar to amber colored lenses, though not quite as effectively. The color reduces glare, which is not only important on sunny days or under bright lights, but glare reduction is especially needed when competing on a luminous, winter day after a snowfall. Blue also helps accentuate contours and heightens color perception. Many prefer blue lenses for foggy or misty days in the field.

Red

A red lens absorbs some green light and offers the visual acuity and sharpness offered by amber lenses. However, the hue is not as effective outdoors in the early morning or late afternoon hours. This color also generally filters out light that is considered harsh and harmful to the eyes.

Green

A green lens sufficiently blocks red and infrared light waves that are produced by the sun. The color also serves well for fighting glare in an extremely bright environment.

Smoke

Smoke lenses come in tint variations that range from lightly gray to almost completely black. The color transmits all of the other colors of the spectrum, so the viewer gets full, true-color perception without distortions. In addition to providing adequate protection on sunny days, smoky tones help combat eye fatigue. The grayish hues are also the best tint for reducing the high glare often encountered when near bodies of water. While a paintball mask equipped with a smoked lens is often used daily, the color is not recommended when engaged in battle in a dense forest, while indoors or at night.

Mirrored

While most are familiar with a basic silver chrome mirrored lens, this tint style comes in virtually every color of the rainbow. Mirrored lenses offer the darkest level of tint available and provide the ultimate protection on a bright sunny day or in the snow while simultaneously providing excellent visibility.

Hybrid

Similar to the varied tint on an automotive windshield, a hybrid lens has smoke or other dark color tinting on the uppermost portion of the lens that fades to clear or a lighter hue toward the bottom of the lens. The gradation provides the best of both worlds by offering clear viewing while inhibiting harsh light from above.

The Best Ultimate Paintball Markers Under $100

spyderWhether you have recently discovered the sport of paintball or have just finally made the decision to purchase your own equipment instead of renting; choosing paintball markers can seem fairly confusing. Not everyone can afford expensive weaponry or they just prefer not to invest that much money into a side hobby. Elite models can cost  hundreds of dollars or more. There are a number of decent, inexpensive guns on the market that give users a chance to gain skill, develop a style of play and offer versatility, while not emptying out your wallet.

Spyder Xtra Paintball Marker Gun-Black

These lightweight paintball markers feature quality construction while offering respectable performance. Designed for ease of use, the upgraded Xtra version comes equipped with clamping collar feedback. The tool-free striker plug also makes maintenance easier. Recreational users approve of this gun for fun outdoor environments. The many features of the Spyder Xtra include:

* Hard matte finish
* Aluminum construction
* Standard thread foregrip expansion chamber and a vertical adapter
* Pull pin cocking Delrin bolt
* No-slip rubberized grip panel
* Velocity adjustment
* Steel hose line
* Uses CO2 or compressed air
* One-year warranty

 

Azodin Kaos Semi-Auto Paintball Marker Gun – Black or Red

Though priced at well under $100, the Kaos offers impressive features commonly found on paintball markers costing hundreds more, which makes the gun perfect for beginners or experienced veterans alike. The Azodin quickly transitions from single shot to semi-automatic mode. The gun provides optimal performance whether competing in speedball or tournaments. Lightweight, easy to use and decently constructed, the Kaos features:

* A low-rise twist-lock feed neck
* Non-slip rubber grips
* A self-lubricating Delrin bolt
* Double ball detents
* A one-piece 12-inch barrel

 

Tippmann Gryphon Paintball Marker Gun – Black or Red

Though smaller in size, having a mere 10-inch barrel, and extremely light in weight, this is one of the inexpensive paintball markers that delivers ultimate power. The blade trigger provides smooth pulling action. A well-designed internal gas line offers a sleeker, cleaner overall appearance. The Tippmann does not disappoint and proves versatile whether engaged in Capture the Flag or Woodsball. Appropriate for indoors or out, the Gryphon performs well and features:

* An ergonomic front grip
* An inline bolt system
* Center feed design
* Durable composite body construction
* A ported barrel that enhances accuracy while muffling sound

 

Rap4 Tornado Paintball Electric Marker Black + Tacamo Arc Hopper

The Rap4 was designed for versatility as modifying from one conversion to the next takes under a minute’s time. All of the attachments are designed as plug-and-play, making the gun easy to use, upgrade or operate. Pulling maintenance is also a snap. Fieldstrip, clean, oil and reassemble just as quickly. The Rap4′s velocity adjusts from 250fps to 350fps and provides a maximum shooting range of 300 feet. The optional electronic trigger system enables the user to shoot in semi, burst or full-auto modes. With the number of accessories and attachments that are available, the Tornado is one of the most economical paintball markers around. The gun’s many standard features include:

* Uses CO2 or N2
* A vertical feed with a closed receiver and CNC processing
* Durable, corrosion-resistant aluminum body
* External and internal Teflon finish

Paintball Strategy: Knowing your Positions

Editable vector illustration of paint splattered soldiers walkin

It did not take long for paintball strategy and tactics to evolve to the point of designated player positions that can make or break a game. While some positions seem relatively straightforward, they can become muddled as players are removed from the field or when more complicated woodsball games are played. For those that are ready to take their team to the next level, here is a closer look at the basic positions and what skills are needed for each.

The Front

The frontsman, also sometimes referred to as the “front,” is a speedball position that requires tenacity, speed, and the ability to completely trust in one’s teammates. When it comes to paintball strategy for speedball or tournament play, every single player must trust one another, but the fronts take the most aggressive stations and are typically blind to a vast majority of the field. They must rely on the skill and communication of their team to make hits and refrain from being slaughtered.

Mid

The mid player for tournaments is generally seen as the most difficult position for a variety of reasons stemming from paintball strategy. They need a versatile setup that will allow them to lay down suppressive fire for extended periods while still being fast enough to take on a front position if needed. They have to be exceptionally accurate, very athletic, and will be confident in calling out and relaying orders in the heat of a game.

The Back Player

Paintball strategy for the back player is a little more relaxed than the other two positions, but they must be prepared to shoot and yell the entire game. Most back players will never move past the first few bunkers unless the game is very lopsided. They “close down” lanes by laying down fire nonstop and must call out positions, hits, and movement at all times. They are often the last line of defense when a majority of the players are off the field.

Recball

Also referred to as specops paintball, woodsball, and scenario paintball, the teams are much more similar to military units. While many positions are optional, each team must have a strong-willed and knowledgeable leader that can organize games, teams, and squads. Tournament teams have captains as well, but the captain will often take over the role of just another player when the starting horn has been blown. Woodsball players will also need a good amount of riflemen that are a blend of offensive and defensive players with good overall shooting skills and athleticism. For larger fields and games, the role of sniper may come into play with more of a focus on concealed movement and communication than long range kills.

In the end, most players will find themselves playing any mix of positions in order to understand greater paintball strategy and tactics as a whole. It is also important for all players to understand that positions are not dictated by body size, gun style, or the ability to unload thousands of paintballs per match. Instead, these positions are more closely tied to the mindset of the player and their own unique approach to the game.

 

Paintball Hand Signals 101

Two paintball sport players in prootective uniform and mask aimi

If the enemy is close by and you don’t want to reveal your position by speaking aloud, paintball hand signals are an essential communication system for teams. Unless you’re employing walkie talkies or you’re three feet away from a teammate, a hand signal can go a long way in assisting coordination. Every team should issue their own paintball hand signal system that they’re familiar with. However, basic military signals are usually used as a rule of thumb if a private system has not been engaged. When going into a paintball match, remember to appoint one leader or a couple of squad leaders, depending on how many members are present. Check that everyone understands the numerous hand signals, and instruct teammates to consistently keep an eye out for them.

Regroup

A basic hand signal is the twirling of your pointer finger in a circle in the air. It sets you as the rallying point. Other team members should prepare to move to your position or to follow you from cover. This will make certain that your team remains close and cohesive in moving around the course.

Enemy Spotted

One of the most important paintball hand signals is to call out an enemy. To signify that you have spotted an opposing team member, point to your eyes with your pointer and middle fingers. Then, point specifically at or in the direction of the enemy. This signal will ensure where your team needs to fire or where to watch for movement.

Take Cover

Your team needs to know when to diverge from the established formation and to take cover. A fist in the air should tell your teammates to crouch and lay low. They should take cover wherever possible, whether by crawling or sprinting to the location. Make sure that your flanks and rear are protected.

Stop

A vital part of paintball hand signals is the “stop” motion. An open hand held up in the air indicates that everybody should stop what they’re doing, crouch, and aim in different positions. Also, once a team is stopped, it is easier to give out additional orders and signals.

Move Here, There

Be mindful where you place your teammates. If you want to change directions in where you’re going, hold your pointer and middle fingers together and point in a specific direction. The whole team can move to that area, or you can split members up to precise locations. Differentiate between a team and a person direction change by pointing to a single teammate before signaling. If no one was pointed to before the hand signal, then the entirety of the team should move.

I Do and Don’t Understand

Team members can sometimes have difficulty understanding your orders. Perhaps they’re not fully seeing what you’re motioning. If that’s the case, then it would be helpful to have one or two paintball hand signals that convey these feelings in such circumstances. Putting your pointer and thumb together to form a circle and raising your remaining fingers (the symbol for “okay”) is a common show of understanding. Conversely, an upraised hand tilting from side to side implies that you don’t understand.

Make your Own Paintball Field

Paintball Players Took The Defense In The Shelter

Ever dreamed of having your own private paintball battlefield? Having the ability to host your own paintball games without having to deal with wait times or extra costs to use a field are definitely some major perks to creating your own field. Here we will list some fast and easy steps that you can take to fashion your own paintball field.

Find a Location

How many times have you heard the phrase, “Location, location, location?” Well creating your own paintball field is no different. Your paintball field will be most efficient if you have a spacious backyard, own a piece of private land, or have been given prior permission on a plot to use. Do not go out and assume you can occupy any random space that you have found for your own use. Be wary of your intended field’s surroundings and be smart about your location; make sure that it is in an area that is safe and secure. Remember to check with local laws and be 100% sure that you are complying with all regulations; the last thing you want is to get fined for disregarding something so easily avoidable.

Create Obstacles

Aside from actually playing; building structures and fortifications for your field is probably going to be the most creative part of crafting your own playing ground. If you want to speed up the process, you can use any available items such as old furniture, mattresses, cardboard boxes, and scrap wood to use as small bunkers for your field. If it is big enough for you to hide behind and you don’t care about getting some paint on it, it will likely be a perfect fit. If they are accessible to you: empty barrels, wooden planks, camouflage netting, and sandbags also make for some amazing makeshift cover. If you are feeling a bit more inspired and you have the resources, you can build some bunkers out of raw materials such as creating small pillbox style fortifications out of cement and concrete bricks or even dig some trenches for people to lay in for cover. This step allows for imagination as it is all about giving your field that special touch. Be sure to double check your work for anything that could be hazardous to the players on your field, such as rusty metal edges, exposed nails, etc.

Get your Gear Ready

If you have not purchased all of your gear yet, then now is the time. Paintball guns, modifications, safety gear, C02 tanks, and paintballs are all essential items needed to play a quality game of paintball. The importance of the use of safety gear on your paintball field cannot be stressed enough and it is highly encouraged to take the necessary precautions to purchase what you need in order to have an awesome, yet safe time.

Invite your Friends

Of course; no paintball games on your newly created field would be complete without players. Send out those texts, emails, phone calls, and online messages to your friends and rally the troops for battle. You and your friends can plan tournaments, create game scenarios like capture the flag, or duke it out with whichever competitions appeal to you.

3 Things to Consider when Preparing For Paintball Night Games

Paintball Player With Two Guns

The paintball experience can be both rewarding and fun. This is a sport that is growing in popularity due to the teamwork and competition involved. However, there is more to this activity then simply running around and shooting paint at an opponent. There are complex positions and strategies that make this a game of wits. A daytime match of paintball can be a difficult game to win, but playing at night makes it even more complicated. To stand a chance against your nighttime competitors, keep these important considerations when playing a game come nightfall.

Using Night Vision

There are many players that use night vision devices. Monoculars are popular and, in some cases, players can even bring Forward Looking Infra-Red (or FLIR) scopes that mount to the top of the paintball gun. These scopes can easily cut through the darkness and spot a potential opponent. However, these types of scopes are not very common. It is important to remember that players with night vision devices may have an advantage; but there are several ways to defeat them. First, night vision can become challenging for players because they must frequently focus their eyes on a small area. Additionally, the infrared on the night vision device can give away the users position. Although there are some advantages and disadvantages to using night vision; the devices can be useful for much more easily seeing opponents and the playing field.

Use Flashlights Carefully

A flashlight is a good tool to have during a paintball game whether it is used or not. When maneuvering around the field, a flashlight can help to see undetected obstacles and keep players from tripping. When used carefully during a game, the light can brighten a darkened area to reveal sneaky opponents. Some opponents will actually freeze when the light is placed on them – creating a useful advantage. On the other hand, some opponents will see the light and begin shooting at it. It is important to remember that using a flashlight will almost always tell the opposition more about you than about them. In some cases, flashlights can be used to momentarily, yet harmlessly, blind players and secure a defeat. Flashlights are a good tool for night games; however, it is important to use them carefully and sparingly.

Beware of Fogging Goggles

Many experienced players have learned the hard way that goggles fog up quite often during the day. However, the effect is significantly worse at night. To prevent this from happening, players can apply an anti-fog spray to the lens. It is also important to remember to remove dark colored lenses that are worn during daytime play. These dark lenses can add to visibility issues. If goggles fog up during night games, never remove the goggles to clear the fog. This will inadvertently make the problem worse. Experienced players look downward and grab the front of the goggles while pumping them away from the face. This process helps to circulate fresh air inside the mask and clear the fog. Some players also use baby shampoo on the lenses to prevent fog from collecting.

These are only a few things to consider when competing in a nighttime game of paintball. There are many other concerns that can help secure a win or cause defeat. Experienced players have learned the ropes of nighttime play through trial and error. However, whether playing during the day or at night; it is important to remain safe, follow the rules, and most of all have fun.

 

 

10 Paintball Budget Tips

budget

The economy is tight, but you and your friends want to play paintball. You guys have worked hard to earn and save money, and you want to make that money last while enjoying some quality competitive fun.

Well, here are 10 tips to play paintball, while staying on a budget:

  1. Carpool – Whether you’re coming in a private group or as a walk-on, this is a great way to save gas money.
  2. Pump Gun – These guns can be significantly easier on your wallet.
  3. Walk your trigger – This will help maximize your rate of fire.
  4. Maintenance – Take care of your gun and gear and they’ll last longer, meaning fewer replacements.
  5. Buy used – Equipment, guns, etc. (be careful not to get scammed. Remember that old saying – buyers beware).
  6. But consider high end – Whether you buy new or used, buy equipment that is going to last (focus on quality vs. quantity – getting the bang for your buck).
  7. Don’t overbuy – If you don’t need the extensive apparel or extra modifications, than save your money.
  8. Carbon fiber tank – These might be more expensive up front but they last longer.
  9. Keep your change – Throw all of that extra change from those sodas and hamburgers into a jar, it can really add up.
  10. Share your ammo – Split the cost with someone.

At Ultimate Paintball, we hope these money saving tips help. As always, if you need help finding a specific paintball gun or accessory, but are on a tight budget, we’re always here to help!

The Best Paintball Music

heavy metal

When getting into a zone of playing paintball, having music can be an advantageous piece for your mental game. It can help maintain focus, take away nerves, and increases the adrenaline rush associated with combat.

The hard rock, heavy metal genre is overwhelmingly the collective favorite to listen to while playing. In particular, many enjoy Ramstein and Marilyn Manson.

Here’s a list of songs I personally recommend when playing on the field:

  • Trapt – Headstrong
  • Disturbed – Stricken
  • Queen – I Want It All
  • AC/DC – Shoot to Thrill
  • Metallica – Day That Never Comes
  • Metallica – One
  • Green Day – Enemy
  • Evanescence – Bring Me to Life
  • My Chemical Romance – Black Parade
  • 7 Lions – Born To Run
  • Rev Theory – I Hear Voices
  • Fall Out Boy – Sugar We’re Going Down

These are the jams that get the blood pumping and the adrenaline revved. I’m still the nicest guy on the field and I always carry a proper attitude. My AFTER paintball music is entirely different.

How to Become a Paintball Pro

professional paintballer

Professional sports are one of the most lucrative industries in the world today, and it seems that everybody wants in on the action. Due to its success, the industry has expanded to include non-traditional sports such as video gaming and arm wrestling. Competitive paintballing is another extreme sport that’s gained tons of exposure and popularity over the years, and paying leagues are starting to pop up in various places throughout the country. If you want to make a living entertaining yourself and others, here are some tips on how to make it as a paintball pro.

Make Up Your Mind, and Set Your Goals

Playing professional sports is a dream for many people, but the truth is that most won’t ever make it big. However, this fact should not keep you from enjoying what you love to do. Most professional athletes never expected to go to the pros. They simply stuck with their passion year after year, while brushing off every word of discouragement. This is how you should approach becoming a paintball pro as well. Set your goals, one step at a time, and do everything in your power to achieve them. Making it to the pros is both a matter of physical strength and mental strength. If you don’t have the will to see things through, you’ve already given up.

Practice like Your Life Depends on It

It’s true that some paintballers are just naturally good at the game, but consistent practice can transform any newbie into an expert player. Like with any other sport, you’re going to have to dedicate most of your free time to getting better. That means practicing drills over and over until the movements become natural to you.

Some of the fundamental techniques you’re going to have to master include: stationary shooting, running and gunning, snap shooting, and ducking for cover. Stationary shooting is basic target practice. The exercise builds your accuracy, precision, and timing. Running and gunning is something that all paintball pros can do very well. When you’re running around, you’re defenseless. Shooting and running is primarily a defensive maneuver, but it can also be used to ambush unsuspecting opponents. Snap shooting refers to popping out from behind cover to fire a few shots, then retreating to your safe spot. You’ll need to master both ducking for cover and snap shooting to be an effective player.

Get Into Great Physical Shape

Paintballing is a very physical activity. To keep up with the best of the best, you should train like a serious athlete. This means building stamina and strength using traditional methods. Running is the most effective way to enhance your cardiovascular health so that you don’t burn out during play. Weight training will give you the muscles to perform explosive movements and lug around all that heavy gear without tiring too quickly. Condition each day, and supplement your training with nutritious meals and lots of rest.

Enter Local and Amateur Competitions for Exposure

To become a paintball pro, you have to showcase your skills. The only real way to do so is to enter every competition you can. Only when you’ve caught the attention of pro recruiters, sponsors, and other industry big wigs will you have a shot at going pro.

Network with Other Players

During your competitions, get to know your teammates and even your opponents. They can provide you with some very valuable advice on the technicalities of paintball and how to get noticed. Having the right connections can exponentially boost your chances of becoming a paintball pro.

Common Paintball Injuries

paintball hit

 

Paintball is a sport that is a lot of fun, but it can also come equipped with substantial risk of injury. While the safety gear that is used to play paintball is generally sufficient for protection, it cannot always 100 percent effective. Players can suffer injuries that range from mild to very severe, but the vast majority of players will remain relatively safe providing they wear the right gear and take safety precautions. Here is a look at some of the most common paintball injuries that players incur.

Scrapes and Cuts

While people think that the most common paintball injuries result from getting hit by  fast-flying paintballs; scrapes and cuts are more likely to occur. Players can easily scrape, bruise and cut themselves when they are in the midst of heavy paintball action. They may jump behind a barrier for safety or dive out of the way, forcefully brushing against an object with enough impact to leave a mark. Players can help to prevent these types of injuries by wearing ample safety padding and being careful about how they maneuver through the paintball course.

Knee and Ankle Injuries

Just like all other types of action sports, a very common type of injury in paintball is twisting a knee or ankle. Players frequently make sharp turns while they are engaging in a paintball battle. These types of sudden movements can certainly lead to injuries if players are not careful. It is best to warm up and get a good stretch in before playing to help prevent these kinds of injuries. Wearing supportive footwear, ankle braces and knee braces can also help in prevention.

Bruises

Paintballs are fired out of the muzzles of paintball guns at around 300 feet per second. When the balls hit unprotected skin at this speed, they are highly likely to leave a nasty bruise. This is why it is so important for players to wear the right safety garments. Even with high quality paintball armor on, there will always be little gaps where paintballs have a chance to impact the skin. Luckily, these injuries are not serious even though they may be a bit sensitive to the touch and even gruesome to look at.

Head and Eye Injuries

Although these are the least common types of injuries that occur to paintball players, they need to be discussed due to the seriousness of their damage. A paintball that hits a player’s eye could be so severe it could potentially lead to the loss of the eye. Players must always wear high-quality safety goggles to prevent such a scenario. Also, players should never shoot at each other inside of a distance of 10 feet to help thwart any accidents.

Head injuries can be even more dangerous. Players who fall and bang their head while playing could experience concussions, brain hemorrhaging and even death. It is crucial that players always wear quality safety helmets to constantly keep their heads protected during paintball matches.

As long as players are always diligent about wearing the right safety equipment and playing safely, they can keep their paintball injuries to a minimum.

Top Workouts for Paintballers

push ups

Paintball is not just a weekend pastime anymore. Gone are the days when paintball was only used as a corporate team building exercise or an activity to do on a whim with a couple of buddies. Over the past ten years, paintball has become a sport where individuals or teams compete vigorously for more than just bragging rights. Professional teams play varieties of styles, such as woodsball and speedball, earning salaries that are comparable with athletes in other more widely known sports. In fact, in 2006, Oliver Lang inked a deal that earned him $100,000 and made him the highest paid paintball player in the world.

So, how do paintball players prepare for the rigorous physical activity required in the sport? With game play that is very replicative of military maneuvers, participants must focus on a regimen that keeps them quick, agile, and resilient. Here are some of the exercises that are perfect for paintball players.

Core Work

Core work is excellent for paintball players because it is imperative to have strong core muscles when partaking in a variety of practical tactics during a battle, such as army crawls. A strong core affects the ability to pump ones legs and run quickly, hurdle down objects, and make sudden direction changes. Planks and weighted abs are great options for strengthening the core muscles.

Sprinting

Quick. That’s a word that should be connected to paintball as an inherent part of the sport. Paintball players who have speed on their side tend to have the upper hand. Those who do not have this ability naturally can improve their skills by doing sprint training. Pumping ones legs up and down while standing in a pool, or simply running in place, will help prepare your body for the intense spurts of movement required for sprinting. Once you feel comfortable, engage in daily sprints. Try and increase the number or distance you do each day, and over time, participants will be able to see a marked change in their speed.

Endurance Training

Cardiovascular levels are paramount in this active, fast-paced sport. While there are times where strategy wins out and movements should be slow and calculated, there are also times when endurance takes over and participants must be ready to tax themselves at a moment’s notice. Burpees, mountain climbers, and interval training come in handy here. Running on a treadmill and going hard for 30 seconds, then recovering for 30 seconds over a span of 20 minutes will provide that HIIT (high-intensity interval training) boost that paintballers need.

Body Weight Exercises

There’s nothing wrong with a couple of good, old fashioned squats. With the amount of crouching and crab crawling essential in paintball, squats and lunges are extremely applicable to your workout routine. They strengthen the legs and build the muscles needed to make your strategy effective. Pushups help with shoulder fatigue and overall arm strength. It’s time to whip out those old calisthenics, because they still work and always will.
Paintball players pull from a wide range of skills to be effective in the game. Being physically prepared in conjunction with planning strategic moves is prudent to remain competitive in battle. Whether you are a weekend warrior out to tag your buddies before they get you, have aspirations of making it to the big leagues, or are already a professional paintball player, these exercises will help you improve your physical endurance and keep you ahead in the game.